Global Security Matrix: Web Archive
Explore Witness Discuss Apply
Human State System Network Global
Warfare Query Query Query Query Query
Terrorism and Crime Query Query Query Query Query
States at Risk Query Query Query Query Query
Resource Conflict Query Query Query Query Query
Pandemics Query Query Query Query Query
Environment Query Query Query Query Query
W.M.D. Proliferation Query Query Query Query Query
InfoWar Query Query Query Query Query
all.gif
Items matching "Human"
  1. Dozens Held Amid Fears of More Unrest in Kyrgyzstan - NYTimes.com | OSH, Kyrgyzstan — Fearful that violence could spread to the north of Kyrgyzstan, police in the capital of Bishkek said on Wednesday that 111 people had been detained on suspicion of trying to foment unrest, as accusations mounted that days of brutal bloodletting in the country’s south had been deliberately organized. | 2010--0-6-
  2. Militant Group Expands Attacks in Afghanistan - NYTimes.com | KABUL, Afghanistan — A Pakistani-based militant group identified with attacks on Indian targets has expanded its operations in Afghanistan, inflicting casualties on Afghans and Indians alike, setting up training camps, and adding new volatility to relations between India and Pakistan. | 2010--0-6-
  3. U.S. Is Still Using Private Spy Ring, Despite Doubts - NYTimes.com | Top military officials have continued to rely on a secret network of private spies who have produced hundreds of reports from deep inside Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to American officials and businessmen, despite concerns among some in the military about the legality of the operation. | 2010--0-5-
  4. Turkey Detains More Military Officers - NYTimes.com | Turkish authorities detained 18 serving and retired military officers Friday, adding to fears that the conflict between the country’s secular military and religiously inspired government was worsening. | 2010--0-2-
  5. BBC News - Iran\'s supreme leader denies nuclear report claims | Iran's supreme leader has denied it is developing nuclear weapons, after a new report from the UN atomic watchdog, the IAEA, sparked an international outcry. | 2010--0-2-
  6. BBC News - Afghan police deployed in Helmand warzone | Hundreds of Afghan police officers have been deployed in areas captured by Nato forces fighting a major offensive against the Taliban, officials say. | 2010--0-2-
  7. Missile Strike Kills Militant Haqqani’s Brother - NYTimes.com | Islamabad, Pakistan — A missile believed to have been fired Thursday from an American drone killed the younger brother of a top militant commander in the North Waziristan tribal area, according to several Pakistani security and intelligence officials, residents in Waziristan and a friend of the commander’s family. | 2010--0-2-
  8. Iran Controls Protests and Defies West on Nuclear Fuel - NYTimes.com | CAIRO — Iran’s president boasted Thursday that his nation had the capacity to make weapons grade nuclear fuel if it chose to, in a speech designed to rally the nation as it marked the 31st anniversary of the Islamic Revolution. | 2010--0-2-
  9. BBC News - Somali rebels 'pour into Mogadishu' | Hundreds of Somali insurgents loyal to Islamist group al-Shabab have poured into Mogadishu with artillery and trucks, witnesses say. | 2010--0-2-
  10. Pakistan Is Said to Pursue Role in U.S.-Afghan Talks - NYTimes.com | ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Pakistan has told the United States it wants a central role in resolving the Afghan war and has offered to mediate with Taliban factions who use its territory and have long served as its allies, American and Pakistani officials said. | 2010--0-2-
  11. China Indicts Rio Tinto Staff on Bribery Charges - NYTimes.com | SHANGHAI — A Chinese prosecutor handed down indictments on Wednesday against an Australian citizen and three Chinese employees of British-Australian mining giant Rio Tinto, charging them with accepting bribes and stealing trade secrets. | 2010--0-2-
  12. Former Pakistani Official Attacked in Rawalpindi - NYTimes.com | ISLAMABAD, Pakistan— Three people were killed when unidentified gunmen opened fire at the election office of a former federal minister and opposition leader Monday evening in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, police and rescue officials said. At least five people were wounded. | 2010--0-2-
  13. Chinese Pollution Census Reveals Greater Reach of Water Contamination - NYTimes.com | BEIJING — China’s government on Tuesday unveiled its most detailed survey ever of the pollution plaguing the country, revealing that water pollution in 2007 was more than twice as severe as official figures that had long omitted agricultural waste. | 2010--0-2-
  14. Iran Begins Enriching Uranium to a Higher Level - NYTimes.com | PARIS — Brushing aside international calls for stricter sanctions against it, Iran said Tuesday it had begun enriching uranium for use in a medical reactor to a higher level of purity, raising the stakes again in its dispute with the United States and other countries over its nuclear program. | 2010--0-2-
  15. Iran Moving to Silence Dissent With Arrests, Analysts Say - NYTimes.com | CAIRO — In recent weeks, Iranian security officials have unleashed a wave of arrests across the country in an effort to neutralize the political opposition, silence critical voices and head off widespread protests when the nation marks the anniversary of the revolution on Thursday, Iran analysts inside and outside the country said. | 2010--0-2-
  16. U.S. and China Vow Action on Climate Threat but Cite Needs - NYTimes.com | UNITED NATIONS — Some 100 heads of state gathered at the United Nations on Tuesday for an unprecedented daylong conference on combating climate change, with leaders like Presidents Obama and Hu Jintao of China acknowledging that agreement is an important goal, but also stressing their own needs. | 2009--0-9-
  17. BBC NEWS | Middle East | Iran \'closer to nuclear weapon\' | Iran is moving closer to being able to make a nuclear bomb, the US envoy has told a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. | 2009--0-9-
  18. Lush Land Dries Up, Withering Kenya’s Hopes - NYTimes.com | LOKORI, Kenya — The sun somehow feels closer here, more intense, more personal. As Philip Lolua waits under a tree for a scoop of food, heat waves dance up from the desert floor, blurring the dead animal carcasses sprawled in front of him. | 2009--0-9-
  19. News Analysis - Can Buildup in Afghanistan Prevent Terror Attacks? - NYTimes.com | WASHINGTON — Does the United States need a large and growing ground force in Afghanistan to prevent another major terrorist attack on American soil? | 2009--0-9-
  20. U.S. Share of Worldwide Arms Market Grows - NYTimes.com | WASHINGTON — Despite a recession that knocked down global arms sales last year, the United States expanded its role as the world’s leading weapons supplier, increasing its share to more than two-thirds of all foreign armaments deals, according to a new Congressional study. | 2009--0-9-
  21. New Protests Reported in Restive Chinese Region - NYTimes.com | BEIJING — Thousands of Han protesters swarmed around government buildings in the capital of the restive Xinjiang region on Thursday to demand a crackdown on Uighurs after rumors spread that they were sticking hundreds of Hans with H.I.V.-tainted hypodermic needles. | 2009--0-9-
  22. Hitmen Kill 17 in Mexico Rehab Clinic - NYTimes.com | CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico — As many as a dozen men armed with automatic weapons stormed into a drug rehab center in this violent border city Wednesday night, lined up the recovering drug addicts and alcoholics against a wall and opened fire at point-blank range, killing 17 people. | 2009--0-9-
  23. BBC NEWS | South Asia | Afghan election fraud row mounts | A row over alleged fraud in the Afghan presidential election has intensified, after a tribe in the south made the most serious claim so far. | 2009--0-9-
  24. Lead Pollution From Smelter Poisons More Than 1,300 Children in China - NYTimes.com | BEIJING — Lead pollution from a newly opened and unlicensed manganese smelter has poisoned more than 1,300 children in southeastern China’s Hunan Province, state-run media said on Thursday, the second case of mass lead poisoning in the past month. | 2009--0-8-
  25. BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Science ponders \'zombie attack\' | If zombies actually existed, an attack by them would lead to the collapse of civilisation unless dealt with quickly and aggressively. | 2009--0-8-
  26. Afghanistan Hit by Attacks Just Days Before Election - NYTimes.com | KABUL, Afghanistan — Unnerved by another wave of deadly pre-election attacks by Taliban insurgents including a rocket assault aimed at the presidential palace, the Afghan government on Tuesday ordered unusual restrictions on all news organizations, banning them from reporting suicide bombings and other violence during the Thursday vote. | 2009--0-8-
  27. Gangs Blamed as 19 Inmates Die in Prison Melee in Mexico - NYTimes.com | MEXICO CITY (AP) — A prison fight that officials describe as a “dispute for dominance” among drug and organized crime gangs left 19 inmates dead and more than 20 injured at a prison in northern Mexico. | 2009--0-8-
  28. Bomb Kills 7 Near NATO’s Afghan Headquarters - NYTimes.com | KABUL, Afghanistan — After a huge car bomb exploded in the center of the capital on Saturday morning, killing seven people and wounding 91, President Hamid Karzai said Afghans would not be deterred from voting in national elections in five days. | 2009--0-8-
  29. 2 Killings Stoke Kashmiri Rage at Indian Force - NYTimes.com | SHOPIAN, India — On a sunny late spring afternoon, Asiya and Nilofa Jan left home to tend to their family’s apple orchard. Along the way they passed a gantlet of police camps wreathed in razor wire as they crossed the bridge over the ankle-deep Rambi River. | 2009--0-8-
  30. Clashes Kill Over 20 in Russia Region - NYTimes.com | MOSCOW — More than 20 people were killed in violent clashes in Russia’s North Caucasus region in the last two days, including a mysterious attack on seven women in a sauna, underscoring the Kremlin’s continued struggles to bring the volatile area under control. | 2009--0-8-
  31. BBC NEWS | Europe | Missing ship \'found\' off Africa | A missing merchant ship with 15 Russian crew members on board has been spotted off the coast of West Africa, unconfirmed reports say. | 2009--0-8-
  32. As Afghan Vote Nears, Taliban Step Up Intimidation Campaign - NYTimes.com | KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — The Taliban have escalated a campaign of threats and intimidation ahead of the presidential election next Thursday, warning voters in mosques and through leaflets and radio announcements not to vote, or face “strong punishment.” | 2009--0-8-
  33. Bombs Kill 14 Civilians in Afghanistan - NYTimes.com | KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Two bomb explosions in southern Afghanistan killed 14 people, including 3 children at play, Afghan officials said Thursday, as mounting violence before next week’s elections exacts an increasing toll on civilians caught up in the broadening war with the Taliban. | 2009--0-8-
  34. 23 Filipino Soldiers Killed in Clashes - NYTimes.com | MANILA — In one of the deadliest clashes in the southern Philippines in recent years, at least 31 suspected terrorists and 23 soldiers were killed as government troops stormed training camps of the Islamist militant group Abu Sayyaf, military officials said Thursday. | 2009--0-8-
  35. Europe Extends Myanmar Sanctions - NYTimes.com | BANGKOK — In the first concrete response to the conviction this week of Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the European Union said it would impose sanctions against members of the judiciary responsible for the verdict, as well as against state-run media and other enterprises. | 2009--0-8-
  36. At least 20 killed in Iraq blast - CNN.com | BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- At least 20 people were killed and 30 wounded in a double suicide bombing Thursday in northern Iraq, an Iraqi Interior Ministry official said. | 2009--0-8-
  37. North Korea to ‘Weaponize’ Its Plutonium - NYTimes.com | SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea responded Saturday to new United Nations sanctions on Friday by defiantly vowing to press forward with the production of nuclear weapons and take “resolute military actions” against international efforts to isolate it. | 2009--0-6-
  38. Somalia: one week in hell – inside the city the world forgot | n a rare dispatch from war-ravaged Mogadishu, Ghaith Abdul-Ahad found a city daring to hope for a break from years of violence. Then the fighting resumed | 2009--0-5-
  39. Swine flu: the worst is yet to come in autumn, warns Alan Johnson - Telegraph | Alan Johnson said that the lesson of past pandemics was that initially mild outbreaks had been followed by something "much more serious". | 2009--0-5-
  40. Tamiflu linked to abnormal behaviour | smh.com.au | Influenza patients between 10 and 17 who took Tamiflu were 54 per cent more likely to exhibit serious abnormal behaviour than those who did not take the antiflu drug, a final report from a Japanese Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry research team, said. | 2009--0-5-
  41. The Associated Press: WHO says up to 2B people might get swine flu | GENEVA (AP) — Up to 2 billion people could be infected by swine flu if the current outbreak turns into a pandemic lasting two years, the World Health Organization said Thursday. | 2009--0-5-
  42. Gates replacing top U.S. commander in Afghanistan - CNN.com | WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan -- Gen. David McKiernan -- will be replaced by Lt. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, Defense Secretary Robert Gates announced Monday afternoon. | 2009--0-5-
  43. Official: 5 killed after U.S. soldier opens fire on Iraq base - CNN.com | A U.S. soldier is in custody after opening fire on his fellow troops Monday, killing five American service members, the U.S. military confirmed. | 2009--0-5-
  44. Iraq sticking with U.S. withdrawal plan despite attacks - CNN.com | BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- Iraq's government said Sunday it won't extend a June deadline for U.S. combat troops to leave Iraqi cities despite concerns about ongoing attacks in cities like Mosul. | 2009--0-5-
  45. Underground Threat: Tunnels Pose Trouble from Mexico to Middle East - TIME | With swine flu frenzy gripping the U.S., the threat coming from south of the Mexico border may seem more real to many Americans than ever before. But the U.S. border authorities who patrol that 1,969 mile long border have another stealth threat to worry about. This month, they will begin installing the first small, 50 mile segment of a "virtual fence" on the dividing line with Mexico. By 2014 most of the border will be home to sensor-equipped towers that are linked to a central communications network. But while proponents argue that the system will help stem the flow of illegal immigrants, drugs and arms coming over the border, most experts admit it will do little to guard against people making their way under it. | 2009--0-5-
  46. Hysteria over swine flu is the real danger, some say - CNN.com | (CNN) -- As the number of swine flu cases rises around the world, so is a gradual backlash -- with some saying the threat the virus poses is overblown. | 2009--0-5-
  47. BBC NEWS | Americas | Swine flu spread 'not sustained' | There is no evidence of the swine flu virus spreading in a sustained way outside North America, a top World Health Organization official says. | 2009--0-5-
  48. The big sleep - The National Newspaper | The Sunni militiamen of the Awakening movement have outlived their usefulness to American forces and the Iraqi government. Some worry these unemployed fighters will relaunch the insurgency they left behind – but they don't stand a chance. | 2009--0-4-
  49. Confirmed swine flu cases leap - CNN.com | GENEVA, Switzerland (CNN) -- Confirmed cases of swine flu worldwide increased to 236 on Thursday, up significantly from the previous day's total of 147, the World Health Organization reported. | 2009--0-4-
  50. WHO fears pandemic is 'imminent' | The UN's World Health Organization has raised the alert over swine flu to level five - indicating human-to-human transmission in at least two countries. | 2009--0-4-
  51. UK combat operations end in Iraq | A ceremony has been held in Basra to mark the official end of the six-year British military mission in Iraq. | 2009--0-4-
  52. Terrorism, kidnapping among top fears for today's youth | A five-eyed monster under the bed isn't what worries most kids. Experts say young people fear a lot of what's in the news -- from kidnappings to murders to salmonella. | 2009--0-4-
  53. U.S. soldier jailed for life for killing Iraqis | A U.S. soldier was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison for the killing of four Iraqi detainees in 2007, the Army announced Thursday. | 2009--0-4-
  54. Russia 'ends Chechnya operation' | Russia has ended its decade-long "counter-terrorism operation" against separatist rebels in the southern republic of Chechnya, officials say. | 2009--0-4-
  55. Kenya 'will try Somali pirates' | Eleven Somali pirates captured this week by a French warship are being taken to Kenya for trial, the French defence ministry has said. | 2009--0-4-
  56. Obama supports Mexico's drug war | At the start of a visit to Mexico, President Barack Obama says the US is a "full partner" with Mexico in its fight against the drug cartels. | 2009--0-4-
  57. NATO Meeting to Highlight Strains on Afghanistan | NATO leaders will meet in Strasbourg, France, on Friday to celebrate the 60th anniversary of an alliance that deterred the Soviet Union, opened the door to emerging democracies, battled ethnic cleansing and now welcomes the return of France as a full member. But they also must face the harsh reality that NATO’s first military mission outside Europe is failing in a way that risks fracturing the alliance. | 2009--0-4-
  58. Russia Keeps Some Troops in Georgia, Defying Deal | Nearly eight months after the war between Russia and Georgia, Russian troops continue to hold Georgian territory that the Kremlin agreed to vacate as part of a formal cease-fire, leaving a basic condition of that agreement unfulfilled. | 2009--0-4-
  59. Mexico Reports Arrest of Major Drug Suspect | An heir to one of Mexico's most notorious narcotics empires was grabbed by police as he exercised in a city park, officials announced Thursday, shortly before U.S. and Mexican Cabinet officials met to coordinate attacks on escalating drug violence. | 2009--0-4-
  60. Venezuela: Chavez says he's willing to take Gitmo inmates | Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez says he would be willing to accept prisoners from the Guantanamo Bay detention center, which U.S. President Barack Obama has said he will close, the Venezuelan government said Thursday. | 2009--0-4-
  61. N Korea warned over rocket launch | US President Barack Obama and his South Korean counterpart have agreed a "stern, united response" must follow any rocket launch by North Korea. | 2009--0-4-
  62. US to be 'pragmatic on climate' | The US must balance science with what is politically and technologically achievable on climate change, America's lead negotiator has said. | 2009--0-4-
  63. Mexico drug fighter killed after less than a day on job | MEXICO CITY, Mexico (CNN) -- A recently retired Mexican army general whose bullet-riddled body was found Tuesday near Cancun had taken over as the area's top antidrug official less than 24 hours earlier, officials said. Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich has characterized the battle among drug cartels and with government authorities as a "civil war." | 2009--0-2-
  64. Thousands of guns U.S. sent to Afghanistan are missing | WASHINGTON (CNN) -- More than one-third of all weapons the United States has procured for Afghanistan's government are missing, according to a government report released Thursday. | 2009--0-2-
  65. Uganda: A country adrift, a president amiss | The government fails yet again to defeat the Lord’s Resistance Army. (Economist.com) | 2009--0-2-
  66. Rebuilding Haiti: Weighed down by disasters | A modest success for the United Nations is threatened by nature and lassitude (Economist.com) | 2009--0-2-
  67. Job Losses Pose a Threat to Stability Worldwide | High unemployment rates, especially among young workers, have led to protests in countries as varied as Latvia, Chile, Greece, Bulgaria and Iceland and contributed to strikes in Britain and France. (NYTimes.com) | 2009--0-2-
  68. N Korea restricts border controls | North Korea has begun enforcing stricter border controls with South Korea, due to what it calls "relentless confrontation" from Seoul. | 2008--1-1-
  69. Nigerian city tense after riots | Sporadic gunfire has been heard in the central Nigerian city of Jos, where hundreds are feared dead following two days of religious and ethnic clashes. | 2008--1-1-
  70. Congo rebel chief threatens 'war' | Rebel leader General Laurent Nkunda has threatened war unless the government of DR Congo holds a new round of talks. | 2008--1-1-
  71. The age of 'celebrity terrorism' | Quite apart from the scores murdered and the hundreds injured, what the Mumbai terrorists really wanted was an exaggerated - and preferably extreme - reaction on the part of governments, the media and public opinion. | 2008--1-1-
  72. Congo cease-fire unraveling as fighting spreads | KIWANJA, Congo (AP) -- A fragile cease-fire in Congo appeared to be unraveling Thursday as the U.N. said battles between warlord Laurent Nkunda's rebels and the army spread to another town in the volatile country's east. (cnn,com) | 2008--1-1-
  73. India’s north-east: Bodo count | Assam’s largest tribe goes to war with its Muslims. (Economist.com) | 2008--1-0-
  74. Congo and Rwanda: Old foes, new threats | Fears of another war between two long-time enemies are growing. (Economist.com) | 2008--1-0-
  75. Wary of Islam, China Tightens a Vise of Rules | Some officials contend that insurgent groups in Xinjiang pose one of the biggest security threats to China, and the government says the “three forces” of separatism, terrorism and religious extremism threaten to destabilize the region. But outside scholars of Xinjiang and terrorism experts argue that heavy-handed tactics like the restrictions on Islam will only radicalize more Uighurs. (NYT.com) | 2008--1-0-
  76. Thirsty world: Desperate quest for water | Water is the key to life. It is fundamental to all human activities. Water grows the food we eat, generates the energy that supports our modern economies and maintains the ecological services on which we all depend. Yet billions of people worldwide still lack access to the most basic human right: safe, clean, adequate water. (CNN.com) | 2008--1-0-
  77. Thai and Cambodian troops wounded in clash | PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) -- Soldiers from both Cambodia and Thailand were wounded Friday in a brief clash along their volatile border, officials from the two countries said. (CNN.com) | 2008--1-0-
  78. Huge System for Web Surveillance Discovered in China | A group of Canadian human-rights activists and computer security researchers has discovered a huge surveillance system in China that monitors and archives certain Internet text conversations that include politically charged words. (NYT) | 2008--1-0-
  79. Russia’s armed forces: Advancing, blindly | A more aggressive Russian army is still no match for NATO, but is strong enough to scare some neighbours. (Economist) | 2008--0-9-
  80. Bombings at Embassy in Yemen Leave 16 Dead | BEIRUT, Lebanon — Militants disguised as soldiers detonated two car bombs outside the United States Embassy compound in Sana, Yemen, on Wednesday morning, killing 16 people, including 6 of the attackers, Yemeni officials said. (NYT.com) | 2008--0-9-
  81. Climate change and the poor - Adapt or die | Environmentalists have long said the world should concentrate on preventing climate change, not adapting to it. That is changing. (Economist.com) | 2008--0-9-
  82. Niger Delta rebels ratchet up oil-related violence | LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) -- Nigeria's main militant group said Wednesday that it had destroyed an oil-pumping station and a pipeline crossing southern Nigeria in a rare daylight attack extending violence in the restive region into its fifth day. (CNN.com) | 2008--0-9-
  83. Anarchy-Cursed Nation Looks to Bottom-Up Rule | Does the international community have it all wrong on Somalia? After 17 years, 14 transitional governments and more than $8 billion in foreign aid, the country is as violent and lawless — and many say hopeless — as ever. (NYT) | 2008--0-8-
  84. Ocean ‘Dead Zones’ on the Rise | Coastal oceans are being starved of oxygen at an alarming rate, researchers are reporting, with vast stretches of water along the seafloor depleted of oxygen to the point that they can barely sustain marine life. | 2008--0-8-
  85. Lebanon bomb mars landmark summit in Syria | Lebanon's fragile status quo suffered a new blow yesterday when a bomb killed 18 people in the northern city of Tripoli, the scene of recent sectarian clashes. (Guardian.co.uk) | 2008--0-8-
  86. Drums of war across the borders | Since peace talks with Uganda’s rebels collapsed, some say war must resume. IN MARCH, after nearly two years of on-and-off peace talks, negotiators for Uganda’s Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) announced that their leader, Joseph Kony, an elusive self-styled mystic, was at last ready to emerge from the bush and sign a deal to end one of Africa’s longest wars. (Economist.com) | 2008--0-8-
  87. US warns Russia of lasting impact | The US defence chief has warned relations with Russia could be damaged for years if Moscow does not step back from "aggressive" actions in Georgia. | 2008--0-8-
  88. US warns Russia of lasting impact | The US defence chief has warned relations with Russia could be damaged for years if Moscow does not step back from "aggressive" actions in Georgia. | 2008--0-8-
  89. India farmers die in land protest | At least four farmers have been killed and 50 others - including policemen - injured in clashes in a suburb of the capital Delhi, police say. (BBC) | 2008--0-8-
  90. Chertoff: I'm Listening to the Internet (Not in a Bad Way) | Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff sat down with Threat Level on Monday in Silicon Valley to talk about laptop searches at the border, the government's new-found interest in computer security, and the continuing saga of overeager terrorist watch lists. (wired.com) | 2008--0-8-
  91. Somalia 'threat' to Kenya peace | Kenya's struggle with terrorism will continue as long as neighbouring Somalia remains lawless, the prime minister has said. (BBC) | 2008--0-8-
  92. Russian Gang Hijacking PCs in Vast Scheme | A criminal gang is using software tools normally reserved for computer network administrators to infect thousands of PCs in corporate and government networks with programs that steal passwords and other information, a security researcher has found. (NYT) | 2008--0-8-
  93. Separatist Fighting Erupts in Georgia | MOSCOW — Heavy fighting in the border region between the former Soviet republic of Georgia and a breakaway Georgian enclave erupted overnight on Wednesday and continued throughout the day on Thursday, resulting in the deaths of two Georgian soldiers and more than two dozen injuries. | 2008--0-8-
  94. Mexican Migrants Carry H.I.V. Home | The first AIDS cases diagnosed in Mexico in 1983 were found among migrants, researchers say. Since then, studies have continued to show that migrants to the United States make up a significant percentage of those contracting the disease. (NYT) | 2008--0-8-
  95. Fired generals lead coup in Mauritania | NOUAKCHOTT, Mauritania (AP) -- Army officers upset with the president's overtures toward Islamic hard-liners staged a coup in Mauritania on Wednesday, overthrowing the first government to be freely elected in this sprawling desert nation in more than 20 years. (CNN) | 2008--0-8-
  96. Policing the world with remote-controlled aircraft | An article discussing the use of 'drones' in the Middle East. (Slate.com) | 2008--0-7-
  97. Population control: The marathon’s not over | In some parts of the world, family planning is still a distant dream THREE decades ago, many pundits were saying that an ever-rising population could lead to global disaster. They argued that ecological catastrophe, resource wars and other tragedies were inevitable unless radical measures were taken to defuse the coming “population bomb”. Happily, a mixture of technological innovation, economic dynamism and successful population-control strategies have helped defuse that bomb, or at least delay its detonation. (The Economist) | 2008--0-7-
  98. ASEAN and the temple of doom | Modest progress on Myanmar is overshadowed by the threat of war between Thailand and Cambodia FOUR months ago, when Thailand’s prime minister, Samak Sundaravej, visited his Cambodian counterpart, Hun Sen, the two countries seemed capable of dealing peacefully with a long-running dispute over an ancient temple on their borders. Thailand backed Cambodia’s bid to have the 11th-century Preah Vihear temple listed as a “world heritage” site and both sides agreed to keep talking over their overlapping claims to a nearby patch of land. Since then, things have deteriorated to the point where each side has sent thousands of troops to the area. This week talks between the two countries agreed no more than to try to avoid settling things by force. Cambodia asked the UN Security Council to hold an emergency meeting over what it called a state of “imminent war”. (The Economist) | 2008--0-7-
  99. Terrorist Attacks Unsettling India | NEW DELHI — Over the past several years, terrorist attacks in India have become an everyday presence in everyday places. The targets seem to have nothing in common except that they are ordinary and brazenly easy to strike. In eastern Varanasi, a deadly explosion interrupted Hindu devotees as they lighted oil lamps to Hanuman, the monkey god, one Tuesday at dusk. In southern Hyderabad, a homemade bomb planted inside a historic mosque killed worshipers on a Friday afternoon. In Mumbai, India’s largest city, nearly 200 commuters on packed city trains died in a series of blasts. (New York Times) | 2008--0-7-
  100. Assassins in Zimbabwe Aim at the Grass Roots | JOHANNESBURG — Tonderai Ndira was a shrewd choice for assassination: young, courageous and admired. Kill him and fear would pulse through a thousand spines. He was an up-and-comer in Zimbabwe’s opposition party, a charismatic figure with a strong following in the Harare slums where he lived. (New York Times) | 2008--0-7-
  101. Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal | BHOPAL, India — Hundreds of tons of waste still languish inside a tin-roofed warehouse in a corner of the old grounds of the Union Carbide pesticide factory here, nearly a quarter-century after a poison gas leak killed thousands and turned this ancient city into a notorious symbol of industrial disaster. (New York Times) | 2008--0-7-
  102. Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal | BHOPAL, India — Hundreds of tons of waste still languish inside a tin-roofed warehouse in a corner of the old grounds of the Union Carbide pesticide factory here, nearly a quarter-century after a poison gas leak killed thousands and turned this ancient city into a notorious symbol of industrial disaster. | 2008--0-7-
  103. Welcome to our shrinking jungle | A political storm over environmental policy has coincided with a rise in deforestation. From the Amazon last month, Brazil's Indian agency released aerial pictures of painted men with bows and arrows who have had little or no contact with modern civilisation. To judge from their hostile stance, they want to keep things that way. But the Amazon is the responsibility of Carlos Minc, Brazil's hyperactive new environment minister. (The Economist) | 2008--0-7-
  104. Not a sword, but peace | In some cases, only the religious have the patience to be reconcilers WHEN George Bush visited Rome last year, he wanted to see everybody who mattered in world affairs: Pope Benedict, the leaders of Italy—and members of the Sant’Egidio community. Helping warring parties (who may or may not profess a religion) to come together is not quite the same as inter-faith dialogue, though the two things can overlap. Faith-based mediation often involves putting to work in hard secular places the virtues that at least some religious people possess (discretion, modesty, empathy, a non-judgmental cast of mind, an ability to overcome cultural barriers). (The Economist) | 2008-07-03 | 2008--0-7-
  105. Mangrove Loss Partly to Blame for Myanmar Toll | The destruction of mangrove forests that served as a buffer from the sea is partly to blame for the massive death toll from a cyclone in Myanmar, the head of the ASEAN regional bloc said Tuesday.(Discovery Channel News) | 2008--0-5-
  106. Myanmar Reels as Cyclone Toll Hits Thousands - New York Times | Myanmar struggled Monday to recover from a cyclone that killed more than 3,900 people and perhaps as many as 15,000. If those numbers are accurate, the death toll would be the highest from a natural disaster in Asia since the tsunami of December 2004, which devastated coastlines in South Asia and claimed 181,000 lives. Tens of thousands of people were homeless after the cyclone, and food and water were running short. | 2008--0-5-
  107. BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Warming \'affecting poor children\' | Climate change is already affecting the prospects for children in the world's poorer countries, according to Unicef. The UN children's agency says that increases in floods, droughts and insect-borne disease will all affect health, education and welfare. While richer societies can adjust, it says in a new report, poorer ones do not have the resources. It is asking western governments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions swiftly and provide money to help poor nations. "Those who have contributed least to climate change - the world's poorest children - are suffering the most," said David Bull, executive director of Unicef UK. The 2006 Stern Review concluded that climate change could increase annual child deaths in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia by up to 160,000 through GDP loss alone. | 2008--0-4-
  108. BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Bird flu: Indonesia's trial run | Bali runs the world's largest simulation of a bird-flu outbreak, from Friday to Sunday. Involving 1,000 people and over 20 institutions, including the military, Indonesia--the site of half the bird flu deaths in the last outbreak--aims to show the world it is ready should the flu break out again. | 2008--0-4-
  109. Scientists: Smog contributes to premature death - CNN.com | Short-term exposure to smog, or ozone, is clearly linked to premature deaths that should be taken into account when measuring the health benefits of reducing air pollution, a National Academy of Sciences review concludes. "The committee has concluded from its review of health-based evidence that short-term exposure to ambient ozone is likely to contribute to premature deaths," the 13-member panel said. It added that "studies have yielded strong evidence that short-term exposure to ozone can exacerbate lung conditions, causing illness and hospitalization and can potentially lead to death." (CNN) | 2008--0-4-
  110. BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Species loss \'bad for our health\' | A new generation of medical treatments could be lost forever unless the current rate of biodiversity loss is reversed, conservationists have warned. They say species are being lost before researchers have had the chance to examine and understand their potential health benefits. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  111. World Bank tackles food emergency | World Bank head Robert Zoellick warned that 100 million people in poor countries could be pushed deeper into poverty by spiralling prices. The crisis has sparked recent food riots in several countries including Haiti, the Philippines and Egypt. "As we know, learning from the past, those kind of questions sometimes end in war," he said. He said the problem could lead to trade imbalances that may eventually affect developed nations, "so it is not only a humanitarian question". (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  112. Middle East water crisis warning | Governments in the Middle East and North Africa need to invest now if they want to avoid severe water shortages in the future, the World Bank has warned. The amount of water available per person in the arid region will halve by 2050, a report from the bank estimates. It blames climate change and population growth for new pressures on supplies. Governments in the region should tackle water waste, build more efficient networks and reduce water use, the World Bank says. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  113. Diary: Sierra Leone slum medic | A medic in a slum outside Freetown recounts the difficulties of life in this area. Women and children face violence from abusive husbands and fathers. The river is full of waste and trash, most of which comes from Freetown and can be the cause of diseases like cholera in the slum. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  114. Saving Nigerians from risky abortions | Figures show that 10,000 women die every year in Nigeria from unsafe abortions, carried out by untrained people in unsanitary conditions. That is 27 deaths every day. According to the US-based Guttmacher Institute, that is one sixth of the total number of women who die worldwide from such procedures. "Making more abortions available is not the answer," says Saudata Sani, a female member of the House of Representatives for Kaduna state, in northern Nigeria. "Women need to be educated about their rights over their body and given opportunities to plan their families, but it must be done in a way that protects public morality." (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  115. Is Nepal's democracy in danger? | A political crisis in Nepal is set to worsen after the postponement, for the third time, of elections for a Constituent Assembly (CA) that has to draw up a blueprint for the country's future. Many people have begun to talk about Nepal entering an era of either ultra-rightist (military or military-backed) or ultra-leftist (Maoist) dictatorship. They are not ruling out bloodshed between the army and the Maoists, who have concentrated a large number of their members in Kathmandu. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  116. BBC NEWS | Business | Rice prices hit Philippines poor | The Philippines faces an extreme rice shortage. Hard-hit by the shortage, peasants and lower-class Filipinos are outraged that the government has denied that there is a serious problem and has not put forward any real solutions. Half the world's population relies on rice as a huge part of daily life, and this shortage could have a lasting impact on much of East and Southeast Asia. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  117. Nigeria: A Community's Environmental Albatross | Onigbedu, a community in Ogun State, is currently facing major environmental crises due to alleged unlawful operation of the limestone-mining companies there. One inhabitant explained how the operation of the companies threatened livelihood, and life too had become unbearable because of environmental problems and health hazard their operations had caused since the factories started work at different times in the 1990s. (ThisDay) | 2008--0-3-
  118. Launch of BICC ‘Resource Conflict Monitor’ | Bonner Wirtschaftsblog - Nachrichten aus Bonn | On 12 March, 12:00, BICC (Bonn International Center for Conversion in cooperation with UNU/EHS will launch the ‘Resource Conflict Monitor’ (RCM). The RCM is a unique tool for research and information on the nexus between natural resources and violent conflict. For many developing countries, the extraction of natural resources has been a blessing, as their export can provide urgently needed development capital. For others, however, resource wealth has been a curse, as their population still faces extreme poverty and they have been haunted by corruption, government failure and violent conflict. While political and institutional deficits have been widely cited as sources for economic failure and violent conflict, there is still a lack of understanding and empirical study on the impact of governance factors on the resource-conflict dynamic. | 2008--0-3-
  119. UK: The diversity of modern security threats | Today, the threats are more diverse than during the Cold War and include failing states, terrorism and organised crime - threats which cross boundaries and where the citizen is more directly affected. Globalisation has compounded many of these risks - with the growth in international travel, for instance, increasing the speed of flu pandemics spreading or facilitating greater migration of people away from areas suffering from climate change. (BBC) | 2008--0-3-
  120. Flu pandemic is biggest threat to security, strategy says - Telegraph | The biggest threat to Britain at the present time is a flu pandemic. An outbreak could cause the deaths of up to 750,000 people, according to the strategy. The strategy found: “We estimate that a pandemic could cause fatalities in the United Kingdom in the range of 50,000 to 750,000 although both the timing and impact are impossible to predict exactly.” An influenza pandemic is one which spreads on a worldwide scale and infects a large proportion of the human population. Pandemics can cause high levels of mortality, with the Spanish influenza being responsible for the deaths of over 50 million people. | 2008--0-3-
  121. 'Slaves' saved from Italy circus | The case of a Bulgarian family subjected to poor treatment by an Italian circus has highlighted the plight of people caught up in human trafficking networks in Europe. (BBC) | 2008--0-3-
  122. US seeks terrorists in web worlds | The US government has begun a project to develop ways to spot terrorists who are using virtual worlds. (BBC) | 2008--0-3-
  123. Pakistan blocks 'objectionable' YouTube | Pakistan has become the latest country to block access to the video-sharing Web site YouTube on the grounds that one or more videos on the site offend Islam, authorities said Monday. (CNN) | 2008--0-2-
  124. 'Al-Qaeda boys' in training video | US and Iraqi forces have issued video footage which they say shows children under the age of 11 being armed and trained by al-Qaeda. (BBC) | 2008--0-2-
  125. Al-Qaeda: How jihad went freelance | Al-Qaeda has evolved from a single group to an amorphous movement. Does that make it less dangerous or more so? (Economist) | 2008--0-2-
  126. Climate Change and National Security | Climate change presents a serious threat to the security and prosperity of the United States and other countries. Recent actions and statements by members of Congress, members of the UN Security Council, and retired U.S. military officers have drawn attention to the consequences of climate change, including the destabilizing effects of storms, droughts, and floods. This report charts both domestic and international effects of climate change, offering both analyses and policies for future action. (Council on Foreign Relations) | 2008--0-1-
  127. The State of Iraq: An Update | In this New York Times op-ed piece, the authors create their own "matrix" with their own graded shadings to illustrate where we are in Iraq looking at the months of November since the beginning of the war. | 2007--1-2-
  128. Climate Change and National Security | Recent actions and statements by members of Congress, members of the UN Security Council, and retired U.S. military officers have drawn attention to the consequences of climate change, including the destabilizing effects of storms, droughts, and floods. Domestically, the effects of climate change could overwhelm disaster-response capabilities. Internationally, climate change may cause humanitarian disasters, contribute to political violence, and undermine weak governments. (Council on Foreign Relations - PDF) | 2007--1-2-
  129. Cholera crisis hits Baghdad | Iraqi capital fears an epidemic if stricken sewerage system collapses as the rainy season arrives. (Guardian UK) | 2007--1-2-
  130. Malaysia PM issues demo warning | With thousands of ethnic Indians protesting alleged discrimination from the Malays majority, the Malaysian PM is threatening to use the Internal Security Act (ISA), which allows indefinite detention without trial. (BBC) | 2007--1-1-
  131. Sudanese 'to disarm Darfur camp' | With the impending disarmament of thousands of displaced Sudanese citizens by the country's army, many fear that a breakout of violence and bloodshed could disrupt the fragile stability and cause further aggravation. (BBC) | 2007--1-1-
  132. Amazon Fire Wars Exacerbate Global Warming | In Brazil, at the end of the burning season, when people use fire to clear land for farms and ranches, the 'dueling' between land owners leads to more the starting of more fires in order to secure more land. Scientists say this fire cycle is not just destroying parts of the Amazon's southern forests, but altering the climate as well. (NPR) | 2007--1-1-
  133. In Pakistan, a Fight to Stay Connected on the Web | A collection from the New York Times' Lede Blog of articles and pieces written on the web in response to General Musharraf's crackdown in Pakistan. (NYTimes) | 2007--1-1-
  134. America Should Hire al-Qaeda’s PR Agent | An opinion piece that examines al-Qaeda's use of IEDs and other attacks in order to give the impression to both domestic and foreign audiences that America is losing the war. (Good Magazine) | 2007--1-1-
  135. The Iraq war has become a disaster that we have chosen to forget | Discussing the roles of both the media and the government in their inability to accurately report the war in Iraq, this article also touches on the broader affects of the war that are, as it points out, not being broadcasted in mainstream media. (Guardian America) | 2007--1-1-
  136. Pulling the Plug: A Technical Review of the Internet Shutdown in Burma | This bulletin examines the role of information technology, citizen journalists, and bloggers in Burma and presents a technical analysis of the abrupt shutdown of Internet connectivity by the Burmese government on September 29, 2007, following its violent crackdown on protesters there. The shutdown of Internet connectivity was precipitated by its use by citizens to send photographs, updates and videos that documented the violent suppression of protests in Burma, information that contributed to widespread international condemnation of the Burmese military rulers’ gross violations of human rights. (OpenNet Initiative) | 2007--1-1-
  137. Malaria moves in behind the loggers | Deforestation and climate change are returning the mosquito-borne disease to parts of Peru after 40 years. | 2007--1-0-
  138. Cholera Outbreak Highlights Iraq's Plight | As the disease strikes thousands, cholera is just one more example for how sectarian strife cripples basic services. (CBS) | 2007--1-0-
  139. Army Enlists Anthropology in War Zones | An article that examines the surge of Army-hired anthropologists for the first Human Terrain Team, an experimental Pentagon program that assigns anthropologists and other social scientists to American combat units in Afghanistan and Iraq. The team’s ability to understand subtle points of tribal relations — in one case spotting a land dispute that allowed the Taliban to bully parts of a major tribe — has won the praise of officers who say they are seeing concrete results. (NYTimes) | 2007--1-0-
  140. Crocker, Petraeus Hold a News Conference (transcript) | Transcript of the press conference at the National Press Club (9/12/07) with General Petraeus and Ambassador Crocker. (Washington Post) | 2007--0-9-
  141. Edward Burtynsky at Three Gorges Dam | Burtynsky, the Canadian photographer, visits the deconstruction of a village at the future the Three Gorges Dam project in China. | 2007--0-8-
  142. South Asia Victims Face Health Crisis | Millions of people affected by flooding in South Asia face a health crisis unless relief work is urgently stepped up, the United Nations has warned. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Unicef said stagnant waters were "a lethal breeding ground" for diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. (BBC News) | 2007--0-8-
  143. 8 million Iraqis "need urgent aid" | About eight million Iraqis--nearly a third of the population--are without water, sanitation, food and shelter and need emergency aid, a report by Oxfam and the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Coordination Committee in Iraq say. The violence in Iraq is masking a humanitarian crisis that has worsened since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. (CNN) | 2007--0-7-
  144. A Godsend for Darfur, or a Curse? | With the recent announcement that an underground lake the size of Lake Erie rests beneath Darfur, some wonder if this discovery will become a miracle-solution to the region's crisis. The United Nations Environmental Program cites that Darfur “can be considered a tragic example of the social breakdown that can result from ecological collapse," however, many are skeptical that this discovery will be enough to curtail the history of Sudan, a grim chronicle of civil war, famine, coups and despotism. (NYT) | 2007--0-7-
  145. Where Less Is More | An op-ed warning of the potential for setbacks if the U.S. were to focus its attention (and troops) to Afghanistan post-Iraq, citing that the intervention in Afghanistan has gone far better than that in Iraq largely because the American-led coalition has limited its ambitions and kept a light footprint, leaving the Afghans to run their own affairs. (NYTimes) | 2007--0-7-
  146. Guinea-Bissau: Pushers' paradise | Guinea-Bissau, a tiny former Portuguese colony on Africa's west coast, is quickly becoming what may be considered Africa's first 'narco-state' as the continent's drug-distribution hub. (The Economist) | 2007--0-7-
  147. Kids Fear Global Warming More Than Terrorism, Car Crashes, and Cancer | According to National Earth Day Survey, while recent polls show that American adults are most concerned about the war in Iraq, terrorism, and healthcare, a survey of more than 1,000 middle school students across the country found that kids fear global warming more than any of these issues. The survey was conducted by BrainPOP, a New York based educational provider. | 2007--0-4-
  148. Yahoo! sued over torture of Chinese dissident | A Chinese political prisoner sued Yahoo! in a US federal court, accusing the internet company of helping the Chinese government torture him by providing information that led to his arrest. The suit, filed under the Alien Tort Claims Act and the Torture Victims Protection Act, is believed to be the first of its kind made against an American internet company. | 2007--0-4-
  149. Tuberculosis in South Africa - A Global System in Crisis | The spread of a particularly virulent form of tuberculosis in South Africa illustrates a breakdown in the global program that is supposed to keep the disease, one of the world’s deadliest, under control. (NYTimes) | 2007--0-3-
  150. Inside India's Hidden War | Mineral rights are behind clashes between left-wing guerrillas and state-backed militias. Armed with weapons and the opinions of the doctrinaire left, these guerrillas, or Naxalites as they are known, are part of a hidden war in the middle of India's mineral-rich tribal belt. (Guardian) | 2007--0-3-
  151. Bird flu claims first human life in West Africa | Nigeria confirmed the first human death from the H5N1 virus in sub-Saharan Africa on Wednesday after tests on a dead woman showed she had contracted bird flu. (Reuters) | 2007--0-1-
  152. 'Beheading plot' behind terror raid | A major anti-terrorism raid in the UK was intended to foil a plot to kidnap a Muslim soldier serving in the British Army, and behead him, according to a security source. | 2007--0-1-
  153. Climate change seen fanning conflict and terrorism | At a London conference "Climate Change: the Global Security Impact," experts discussed how climate change and global warming could exacerbate tensions between rich and poor countries, potentially increasing security and terrorist threats. As global climate change can create huge flows of refugees, terrorists can exploit these opportunities to their advantage. | 2007--0-1-
  154. Who Dies When the World Catches the Flu? | While the discussion of globalization is usually locked into economics, politics and culture, this article examines globalization's effects on pandemics. | 2006--1-2-
  155. The orphans of Sumqayit | Sumqayit, a small town in Azerbaijan which used to be home to the Soviet Union's largest petrochemicals plant, now harbors hundreds of children with birth defects presumably from the remnants of toxic Soviet era chemicals. The percentage of children born here with Downs syndrome and spina bifida is far above average, and most chilredn are abandoned by their parents and placed in the overcrowded orphanage. | 2006--1-2-
  156. Plastics 'poisoning world's seas' | A team of British researchers have found microscopic particles of plastics in the world's seas that could be poisoning wildlife and endangering the food chain. | 2006--1-2-
  157. Vietnam braces for Typhoon Utor hit | Vietnam expects Typhoon Utor, which killed 7 and forced 90,000 people to evacuate in the Philippines, to make landfall in the next few days and are taking measures to prevent damage to coastal towns. | 2006--1-2-
  158. U.N. says 39.5 million people have HIV | Increasing numbers of people are being infected with HIV and AIDS--and especially alarming is the resurgence in countries where HIV and AIDS were thought to be on the decline--despite the availability of more effective antiretrovirals. | 2006--1-1-
  159. AIDS, heroin two-pronged problem for Afghanistan | Discusses both use of heroin and number and spread of of AIDS cases in particular regard to the country. | 2006--1-1-
  160. Civilian and Humanitarian Security in Darfur: Final Concessions to Khartoum | Article talks about how the international community has all but abandoned Sudan, with many humanitarian organizations pulling out of the region and leaving much of the population unprotected and susceptible to the Janjaweed. | 2006--1-1-
  161. Al Jazeera enters the 'information war' | Article examines how the launch of Al Jazeera English is shaking up the traditional stronghold of major international media outlets on the market for news. | 2006--1-1-
  162. Radioactive Nationalism | Discusses the far-reaching consequences of nuclear weapon proliferation in East Asia and throughout the rest of the world. | 2006--1-0-
  163. China fears consequences of North Korea collapse | Examines the potentially hazardous effects on China if North Korea were to collapse. | 2006--1-0-
  164. Nigeria 3rd Highest Infested Country (HIV/AIDS) | Explores how Nigeria, Africa's most populated country, is battling with the continuing spread of HIV/AIDS and may be unable to meet the UN/World Bank's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2015. | 2006--1-0-
  165. U.S. Pursues Tactic of Financial Isolation | In an attempt to control international funding of terrorists, the U.S. is enacting rules and regulations to prevent banks associated with terrorists from making any deals or transactions with American banks. | 2006--1-0-
  166. A Spectacle of Impotence at the UN: Darfur Security Remains Solely with AU | Chronicles the "abject international failure" of the fledgling African Union's attempt to tackle the humanitarian crisis in Darfur. | 2006--1-0-
  167. The Failure of Diplomacy | Discusses the failure of political diplomacy in the post-World War II era, especially with regard to the nuclear situation in North Korea. | 2006--1-0-
  168. Al-Qaeda's Far-Reaching New Partner | How al-Qaeda is aligning itself with the Algerian group Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (SGPC). | 2006--1-0-
  169. Afghanistan, Five Years On | Discusses how the Taleban is regaining power and influence in the Middle East. Also highlights the issues surrounding US involvement in Afghanistan versus Iraq. | 2006--1-0-
  170. Anti-U.S. Attack Videos Spread on the Internet | On terror/insurgent networks, the internet as a force multiplier, and infowar. | 2006--1-0-
  171. Nuclear Power (Debate) | Audio recording of a debate addressing both environmental and security concerns in regard to nuclear power. | 2006--1-0-
  172. Bonni Benrubi Gallery - Simon Norfolk | As introduced by Norfolk himself: 'these photographs form chapters in a larger project attempting to understand how war and the need to fight war, has formed our world: how so many of the spaces we occupy; the technologies we use; and the ways we understand ourselves, are created by military conflict.' See simonnorfolk.com for complete works. | 2006--1-0-
  173. After Afghan Battle, a Harder Fight for Peace | Post Afgan war, civilians once again feel threatened by NATO coalition forces bombarding into their homes without justifications. For the US, winning the battle at this point is about securing the peace. | 2006--1-0-
  174. The Failed States Index | Great website that tracks the changes of failed states in/from 2005 to now. Highlights not only the successes, but the failures and the constant surfacing of new challenges. | 2006--1-0-
  175. Often Parched, India Struggles to Tap the Monsoon | This article explains the relationship between the natural and human built environment in India. It further explores the effects of monsoons and torrential rains upon humans. With the previous article on India, one can garner impressions about the effects of both ends of the hydrological cycle upon India's population. | 2006--1-0-
  176. A Poison Spreads Amid China | This article shows how China's booming economy is negatively affecting its enviroment and its people. | 2006--1-0-
  177. Diamond Trade Fuels Bloody Wars | | 2006--1-0-
  178. India Struggles to Tap the Monsoon | The article discusses the effect of the torrential rains--the monsoon--in India during the month of August. It also draws a comparison with the current water scarcity in the country. The artice states that the global warming might aggravate the situation. | 2006--1-0-
  179. Europe’s New Dumping Ground | This article discusses how the tsunami of 2004 has created lasting effects on Somalia. The tsunami uncovered containers of hazardous waste that European companies had been dumping offshore for over a decade. Many of the containers broke open and the toxic waste has affected water, land, and air yielding in health effects such as respiratory infections, skin reactions, cancer, and death. | 2006--1-0-
  180. When North Korea Falls | This article explains the threast North Korea poses by having one of the largest biological and chemical aresenals | 2006--1-0-
  181. India Digs Deeper, but Wells Are Drying Up | This NY Times article discusses issues of water resources in India, actions that have lead to overexploitation of groundwater wells, and effects on agriculture, etc. | 2006--1-0-
  182. Suicide Bomber Kills 12 Near Kabul Ministry | | 2006--0-9-
  183. India’s Police Say Pakistan Helped Plot Attack | | 2006--0-9-
  184. Ruined Towns Look to Beirut, Mostly in Vain | | 2006--0-9-
  185. In Teeming India, Water Crisis Means Dry Pipes and Foul Sludge | This article explores the effects upon humans and the state of population growth, resource shortfall, and environmental degradation in India. | 2006--0-9-
  186. GAME: By Donald Barthelme | Sections of David Barthelme, 60 Stories, 1993, p. 63-67. This story makes us question the implications of (nuclear) warfare upon the human psyche. How does a state of fear affect life? What irrationalities lie in states' calculated postures? | 2006--0-9-