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Items matching "Environment"
  1. Chinese Pollution Census Reveals Greater Reach of Water Contamination - NYTimes.com | BEIJING — China’s government on Tuesday unveiled its most detailed survey ever of the pollution plaguing the country, revealing that water pollution in 2007 was more than twice as severe as official figures that had long omitted agricultural waste. | 2010--0-2-
  2. U.S. and China Vow Action on Climate Threat but Cite Needs - NYTimes.com | UNITED NATIONS — Some 100 heads of state gathered at the United Nations on Tuesday for an unprecedented daylong conference on combating climate change, with leaders like Presidents Obama and Hu Jintao of China acknowledging that agreement is an important goal, but also stressing their own needs. | 2009--0-9-
  3. Lush Land Dries Up, Withering Kenya’s Hopes - NYTimes.com | LOKORI, Kenya — The sun somehow feels closer here, more intense, more personal. As Philip Lolua waits under a tree for a scoop of food, heat waves dance up from the desert floor, blurring the dead animal carcasses sprawled in front of him. | 2009--0-9-
  4. Lead Pollution From Smelter Poisons More Than 1,300 Children in China - NYTimes.com | BEIJING — Lead pollution from a newly opened and unlicensed manganese smelter has poisoned more than 1,300 children in southeastern China’s Hunan Province, state-run media said on Thursday, the second case of mass lead poisoning in the past month. | 2009--0-8-
  5. US to be 'pragmatic on climate' | The US must balance science with what is politically and technologically achievable on climate change, America's lead negotiator has said. | 2009--0-4-
  6. Rebuilding Haiti: Weighed down by disasters | A modest success for the United Nations is threatened by nature and lassitude (Economist.com) | 2009--0-2-
  7. Climate change and the poor - Adapt or die | Environmentalists have long said the world should concentrate on preventing climate change, not adapting to it. That is changing. (Economist.com) | 2008--0-9-
  8. Ocean ‘Dead Zones’ on the Rise | Coastal oceans are being starved of oxygen at an alarming rate, researchers are reporting, with vast stretches of water along the seafloor depleted of oxygen to the point that they can barely sustain marine life. | 2008--0-8-
  9. Population control: The marathon’s not over | In some parts of the world, family planning is still a distant dream THREE decades ago, many pundits were saying that an ever-rising population could lead to global disaster. They argued that ecological catastrophe, resource wars and other tragedies were inevitable unless radical measures were taken to defuse the coming “population bomb”. Happily, a mixture of technological innovation, economic dynamism and successful population-control strategies have helped defuse that bomb, or at least delay its detonation. (The Economist) | 2008--0-7-
  10. Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal | BHOPAL, India — Hundreds of tons of waste still languish inside a tin-roofed warehouse in a corner of the old grounds of the Union Carbide pesticide factory here, nearly a quarter-century after a poison gas leak killed thousands and turned this ancient city into a notorious symbol of industrial disaster. (New York Times) | 2008--0-7-
  11. Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal | BHOPAL, India — Hundreds of tons of waste still languish inside a tin-roofed warehouse in a corner of the old grounds of the Union Carbide pesticide factory here, nearly a quarter-century after a poison gas leak killed thousands and turned this ancient city into a notorious symbol of industrial disaster. | 2008--0-7-
  12. Welcome to our shrinking jungle | A political storm over environmental policy has coincided with a rise in deforestation. From the Amazon last month, Brazil's Indian agency released aerial pictures of painted men with bows and arrows who have had little or no contact with modern civilisation. To judge from their hostile stance, they want to keep things that way. But the Amazon is the responsibility of Carlos Minc, Brazil's hyperactive new environment minister. (The Economist) | 2008--0-7-
  13. Mangrove Loss Partly to Blame for Myanmar Toll | The destruction of mangrove forests that served as a buffer from the sea is partly to blame for the massive death toll from a cyclone in Myanmar, the head of the ASEAN regional bloc said Tuesday.(Discovery Channel News) | 2008--0-5-
  14. Myanmar Reels as Cyclone Toll Hits Thousands - New York Times | Myanmar struggled Monday to recover from a cyclone that killed more than 3,900 people and perhaps as many as 15,000. If those numbers are accurate, the death toll would be the highest from a natural disaster in Asia since the tsunami of December 2004, which devastated coastlines in South Asia and claimed 181,000 lives. Tens of thousands of people were homeless after the cyclone, and food and water were running short. | 2008--0-5-
  15. BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Warming \'affecting poor children\' | Climate change is already affecting the prospects for children in the world's poorer countries, according to Unicef. The UN children's agency says that increases in floods, droughts and insect-borne disease will all affect health, education and welfare. While richer societies can adjust, it says in a new report, poorer ones do not have the resources. It is asking western governments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions swiftly and provide money to help poor nations. "Those who have contributed least to climate change - the world's poorest children - are suffering the most," said David Bull, executive director of Unicef UK. The 2006 Stern Review concluded that climate change could increase annual child deaths in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia by up to 160,000 through GDP loss alone. | 2008--0-4-
  16. Scientists: Smog contributes to premature death - CNN.com | Short-term exposure to smog, or ozone, is clearly linked to premature deaths that should be taken into account when measuring the health benefits of reducing air pollution, a National Academy of Sciences review concludes. "The committee has concluded from its review of health-based evidence that short-term exposure to ambient ozone is likely to contribute to premature deaths," the 13-member panel said. It added that "studies have yielded strong evidence that short-term exposure to ozone can exacerbate lung conditions, causing illness and hospitalization and can potentially lead to death." (CNN) | 2008--0-4-
  17. BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Species loss \'bad for our health\' | A new generation of medical treatments could be lost forever unless the current rate of biodiversity loss is reversed, conservationists have warned. They say species are being lost before researchers have had the chance to examine and understand their potential health benefits. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  18. World Bank tackles food emergency | World Bank head Robert Zoellick warned that 100 million people in poor countries could be pushed deeper into poverty by spiralling prices. The crisis has sparked recent food riots in several countries including Haiti, the Philippines and Egypt. "As we know, learning from the past, those kind of questions sometimes end in war," he said. He said the problem could lead to trade imbalances that may eventually affect developed nations, "so it is not only a humanitarian question". (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  19. Middle East water crisis warning | Governments in the Middle East and North Africa need to invest now if they want to avoid severe water shortages in the future, the World Bank has warned. The amount of water available per person in the arid region will halve by 2050, a report from the bank estimates. It blames climate change and population growth for new pressures on supplies. Governments in the region should tackle water waste, build more efficient networks and reduce water use, the World Bank says. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  20. BBC NEWS | Business | Rice prices hit Philippines poor | The Philippines faces an extreme rice shortage. Hard-hit by the shortage, peasants and lower-class Filipinos are outraged that the government has denied that there is a serious problem and has not put forward any real solutions. Half the world's population relies on rice as a huge part of daily life, and this shortage could have a lasting impact on much of East and Southeast Asia. (BBC) | 2008--0-4-
  21. Bloomberg.com: Science | Climate change may provoke conflict between the European Union and Russia as Arctic ice melts, easing access to fossil-fuel deposits and opening new sea routes, the 27-nation bloc's top two foreign policy officials said. "A further dimension of competition for energy resources lies in potential conflict over resources in polar regions which will become exploitable as a consequence of global warming," the report said. "There is an increasing need to address the growing debate over territorial claims and access to new trade routes by different countries which challenge Europe's ability to effectively secure its trade and resource interests." (Bloomberg) | 2008--0-3-
  22. Nigeria: A Community's Environmental Albatross | Onigbedu, a community in Ogun State, is currently facing major environmental crises due to alleged unlawful operation of the limestone-mining companies there. One inhabitant explained how the operation of the companies threatened livelihood, and life too had become unbearable because of environmental problems and health hazard their operations had caused since the factories started work at different times in the 1990s. (ThisDay) | 2008--0-3-
  23. UK: The diversity of modern security threats | Today, the threats are more diverse than during the Cold War and include failing states, terrorism and organised crime - threats which cross boundaries and where the citizen is more directly affected. Globalisation has compounded many of these risks - with the growth in international travel, for instance, increasing the speed of flu pandemics spreading or facilitating greater migration of people away from areas suffering from climate change. (BBC) | 2008--0-3-
  24. $2 million homes burn in 'act of terror,' | Fire engulfed five luxury homes Monday morning at a subdivision north of Seattle in what could be a case of ecoterrorism, officials said. A sign with the letters "ELF" was found at the scene of the fires in the "Street of Dreams" development in Woodinville, Washington, though it is not confirmed if the work was done by the Earth Liberation Front, a group the FBI has called an ecoterrorist group. | 2008--0-3-
  25. Climate Change and National Security | Climate change presents a serious threat to the security and prosperity of the United States and other countries. Recent actions and statements by members of Congress, members of the UN Security Council, and retired U.S. military officers have drawn attention to the consequences of climate change, including the destabilizing effects of storms, droughts, and floods. This report charts both domestic and international effects of climate change, offering both analyses and policies for future action. (Council on Foreign Relations) | 2008--0-1-
  26. Treat flood risk like terror threat, says report author | The torrential downpours that caused billions of pounds worth of damage to thousands of houses this summer should be seen as a "wake-up call" for the country, an interim report said. The report warned that England only narrowly avoided "several near disasters of an even greater magnitude" with an "even greater loss of essential services". (Guardian UK) | 2007--1-2-
  27. Acidic seas may kill 98% of world's reefs by 2050 | The majority of the world's coral reefs are in danger of being killed off by rising levels of greenhouse gases, scientists warned yesterday. Researchers from Britain, the US and Australia, working with teams from the UN and the World Bank, voiced their concerns after a study revealed 98% of the world's reef habitats are likely to become too acidic for corals to grow by 2050. (Guardian) | 2007--1-2-
  28. Climate Change and National Security | Recent actions and statements by members of Congress, members of the UN Security Council, and retired U.S. military officers have drawn attention to the consequences of climate change, including the destabilizing effects of storms, droughts, and floods. Domestically, the effects of climate change could overwhelm disaster-response capabilities. Internationally, climate change may cause humanitarian disasters, contribute to political violence, and undermine weak governments. (Council on Foreign Relations - PDF) | 2007--1-2-
  29. Brazil Announces Size of Tupi Oil Field | The sudden November 8 announcement of the size of the Tupi oil field has pushed Brazil into a delicate and potentially powerful economic and political position in the Americas. The oil field is supposedly large enough to make Brazil a liable rival to Venezuela and some smaller Arab countries, garnering the interests of Venezuela and, particularly, the U.S. | 2007--1-2-
  30. Forests Are Not Green | With the rise of temperatures and increased fears over global warming, Amazon forests may not be able to save the world from climate change; in fact, some argue that their fragile existence could in fact become the biggest contributor to global warming. | 2007--1-2-
  31. Climate Change Threatens (African) Continent | The carbon emissions of developed countries threaten to devastate sub-Saharan Africa in the coming decades, says a major United Nations report issued today. The Human Development Report, commissioned by the UN Development Programme (UNDP), says if the world does not act against climate change within 10 years, a two-degree Celsius temperature increase could have devastating effects for African economy, poverty, and epidemics. (allAfrica.com) | 2007--1-1-
  32. UN climate change report issues 10-year warning | The UN issued today a report citing the urgent need to address global climate change, calling upon the U.S. to spearhead efforts to reduce rising levels of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere, mainly from the use of coal, oil and other fossil fuels. Saying that the least-developed countries would be hit hardest, the report says that emissions should be cut by at least 30% by 2020 and by 80% by 2050. Developing nations should cut emissions by 20% by the year 2050. (Guardian) | 2007--1-1-
  33. Sarkozy in China climate appeal | China maintains that industrialized societies in the West should bear the burden of enacting climate change, but French President Sarkozy emphasizes that climate change should be a global effort, not by a few here or a few there. (BBC) | 2007--1-1-
  34. Amazon Fire Wars Exacerbate Global Warming | In Brazil, at the end of the burning season, when people use fire to clear land for farms and ranches, the 'dueling' between land owners leads to more the starting of more fires in order to secure more land. Scientists say this fire cycle is not just destroying parts of the Amazon's southern forests, but altering the climate as well. (NPR) | 2007--1-1-
  35. Malaria moves in behind the loggers | Deforestation and climate change are returning the mosquito-borne disease to parts of Peru after 40 years. | 2007--1-0-
  36. Britain to claim more than 1m sq km of Antarctica | The United Kingdom is planning to claim sovereign rights to over more than 386,000 sq miles of seabed, and is likely to signal a quickening of the race for territory around the south pole. The claim would be in defiance of the spirit of the 1959 Antarctic treaty, to which the UK is a signatory, specifically stating that no new claims shall be asserted on the continent. The treaty was drawn up to prevent territorial disputes. | 2007--1-0-
  37. Cholera Outbreak Highlights Iraq's Plight | As the disease strikes thousands, cholera is just one more example for how sectarian strife cripples basic services. (CBS) | 2007--1-0-
  38. Edward Burtynsky at Three Gorges Dam | Burtynsky, the Canadian photographer, visits the deconstruction of a village at the future the Three Gorges Dam project in China. | 2007--0-8-
  39. South Asia Victims Face Health Crisis | Millions of people affected by flooding in South Asia face a health crisis unless relief work is urgently stepped up, the United Nations has warned. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Unicef said stagnant waters were "a lethal breeding ground" for diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. (BBC News) | 2007--0-8-
  40. Climate Change Sparks Scrap for Arctic Resources | While scientists and conservationists worry about the potentially dire consequences of global warming, politicians and businessmen are already battling over how to reap the economic benefits from the Arctic thaw. | 2007--0-8-
  41. A Godsend for Darfur, or a Curse? | With the recent announcement that an underground lake the size of Lake Erie rests beneath Darfur, some wonder if this discovery will become a miracle-solution to the region's crisis. The United Nations Environmental Program cites that Darfur “can be considered a tragic example of the social breakdown that can result from ecological collapse," however, many are skeptical that this discovery will be enough to curtail the history of Sudan, a grim chronicle of civil war, famine, coups and despotism. (NYT) | 2007--0-7-
  42. Kids Fear Global Warming More Than Terrorism, Car Crashes, and Cancer | According to National Earth Day Survey, while recent polls show that American adults are most concerned about the war in Iraq, terrorism, and healthcare, a survey of more than 1,000 middle school students across the country found that kids fear global warming more than any of these issues. The survey was conducted by BrainPOP, a New York based educational provider. | 2007--0-4-
  43. Military Sharpens Focus on Climate Change | The U.S. military is increasingly focused on a potential national security threat: climate change. A report about to be released by a group of retired senior generals lays out a detailed case for how global warming could destabilize vulnerable states in Africa and Asia and drive a flood of migrants to richer countries. It focuses on how climate change "can act as a threat multiplier for instability in some of the most volatile regions of the world," in part by causing water shortages and damaging food production. (washingtonpost.com) | 2007--0-4-
  44. UN outlines global e-waste goals | With the world's annual volume of "e-waste" expected to exceed 40 tonnes, the UN has launched a global initiative to tackle the growing mountain of electrical and electronic waste, hooping to create a global recycling standard, extend the life of products and improve the market for second-hand goods. (BBC) | 2007--0-3-
  45. Navy rebuffs state's plea to better protect whales from sonar | The Navy has rejected additional safeguards to protect whales from high-power sonar during war games in Southern California waters, saying that state officials who asked for extra precautions have no authority to tell the U.S. Navy what to do. (LA Times) | 2007--0-2-
  46. Climate change to hit poor worst, says U.N.'s Ban | The world's poor, who are the least responsible for global warming, will suffer the most from the effects of climate change, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told global environment ministers on Monday. (Reuters) | 2007--0-2-
  47. Climate change seen fanning conflict and terrorism | At a London conference "Climate Change: the Global Security Impact," experts discussed how climate change and global warming could exacerbate tensions between rich and poor countries, potentially increasing security and terrorist threats. As global climate change can create huge flows of refugees, terrorists can exploit these opportunities to their advantage. | 2007--0-1-
  48. The orphans of Sumqayit | Sumqayit, a small town in Azerbaijan which used to be home to the Soviet Union's largest petrochemicals plant, now harbors hundreds of children with birth defects presumably from the remnants of toxic Soviet era chemicals. The percentage of children born here with Downs syndrome and spina bifida is far above average, and most chilredn are abandoned by their parents and placed in the overcrowded orphanage. | 2006--1-2-
  49. Plastics 'poisoning world's seas' | A team of British researchers have found microscopic particles of plastics in the world's seas that could be poisoning wildlife and endangering the food chain. | 2006--1-2-
  50. Vietnam braces for Typhoon Utor hit | Vietnam expects Typhoon Utor, which killed 7 and forced 90,000 people to evacuate in the Philippines, to make landfall in the next few days and are taking measures to prevent damage to coastal towns. | 2006--1-2-
  51. Nuclear Power (Debate) | Audio recording of a debate addressing both environmental and security concerns in regard to nuclear power. | 2006--1-0-
  52. Bonni Benrubi Gallery - Simon Norfolk | As introduced by Norfolk himself: 'these photographs form chapters in a larger project attempting to understand how war and the need to fight war, has formed our world: how so many of the spaces we occupy; the technologies we use; and the ways we understand ourselves, are created by military conflict.' See simonnorfolk.com for complete works. | 2006--1-0-
  53. Often Parched, India Struggles to Tap the Monsoon | This article explains the relationship between the natural and human built environment in India. It further explores the effects of monsoons and torrential rains upon humans. With the previous article on India, one can garner impressions about the effects of both ends of the hydrological cycle upon India's population. | 2006--1-0-
  54. A Poison Spreads Amid China | This article shows how China's booming economy is negatively affecting its enviroment and its people. | 2006--1-0-
  55. India Struggles to Tap the Monsoon | The article discusses the effect of the torrential rains--the monsoon--in India during the month of August. It also draws a comparison with the current water scarcity in the country. The artice states that the global warming might aggravate the situation. | 2006--1-0-
  56. Europe’s New Dumping Ground | This article discusses how the tsunami of 2004 has created lasting effects on Somalia. The tsunami uncovered containers of hazardous waste that European companies had been dumping offshore for over a decade. Many of the containers broke open and the toxic waste has affected water, land, and air yielding in health effects such as respiratory infections, skin reactions, cancer, and death. | 2006--1-0-
  57. India Digs Deeper, but Wells Are Drying Up | This NY Times article discusses issues of water resources in India, actions that have lead to overexploitation of groundwater wells, and effects on agriculture, etc. | 2006--1-0-
  58. In Teeming India, Water Crisis Means Dry Pipes and Foul Sludge | This article explores the effects upon humans and the state of population growth, resource shortfall, and environmental degradation in India. | 2006--0-9-